Articles published in 2016 SCC Vol. 5 June 21, 2016 Part 4

Admissibility of Electronic Evidence: It has been highlighted in this article that the admissibility of the secondary electronic evidence has to be adjudged in the light of the principles laid down in Section 65-B of the Indian Evidence Act and the proposition of law settled in the judgments of the Supreme Court along with judgments of the Rajasthan and Delhi High Courts. If the secondary electronic evidence is not accompanied by a certificate issued in terms of Section 65-B of the Evidence Act, it is not admissible in evidence and any opinion of the examiner of electronic records, or the deposition of the witnesses in court pertaining to the contents of such electronic record without Section 65-B compliance cannot be looked into by the courts. [Admissibility of Electronic Evidence by Justice Kurian Joseph, (2016) 5 SCC (J-1)]

 Enforceability of Orders Under Section 17 of The Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996: This article is a reply to an earlier article written by Vikas Singh and Nandadevi Deka “Enforceability of Section 17 of the Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996”, (2015) 4 SCC J-12, which dealt with the enforceability of orders of interim measures of protection passed by the Arbitral Tribunal under Section 17 of the Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996. [Enforceability of Orders Under Section 17 of The Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996: A Reply by Badrinath Srinivasan, (2016) 5 SCC (J-16)]

Judicial decision making: The jurisprudence and process of judicial decision making has been discussed in this article and emphasis has been laid upon the fact that judicial decision making would be free and equal if Judges are more honest about their reasons. [Free and Equal Decision Making by Mohan Parasaran, (2016) 5 SCC (J-9)]

The Semiconductor Integrated Circuits Layout-Design Act, 2000: The nature and scope of the Semiconductor Integrated Circuits Layout-Design Act, 2000 has been discussed in this article. It has been mentioned that the Act provides no civil remedies and it has been stated that a remedy for infringement of rights of the registered proprietor can be only availed in terms of the Act. This impliedly bars the jurisdiction of civil courts in India to entertain disputes related to infringement of layout designs. [The Semiconductor Integrated Circuits Layout-Design Act, 2000 In India and the Conundrum of Jurisdiction by Saurabh Bindal, (2016) 5 SCC (J-27)]

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