2019 SCC Vol. 7 August 28, 2019 Part 4

Agricultural Produce, Livestock and Markets — Allotment of shops — Daud Committee norms for allotment of shops in new wholesale market: Due to huge competition for allotment, there was claim for one vacant large shop (gala) but four eligible claimants (viz. two appellants and R-3 and R-4), hence, instead of allotment by lottery method, offers from eligible claimants should be invited in sealed covers. Directions issued accordingly. [Hande Wavare & Co. v. Ramchandra Vitthal Dongre, (2019) 7 SCC 608]

Causation: Causation in criminal law is one area which is worth studying given the complexities that pervade the notion of causation. This article aims to reconsider the notion of causation. Revisiting Causation: “Unscrewing the Inscrutable” by Dr Birendra Pathak [(2019) 7 SCC J-39]

Civil Procedure Code, 1908 — Or. 37 R. 3 — Leave to defend: Principles to be followed while granting leave, unconditional or conditional, summarized. Ultimate objective of summary suit is expeditious disposal of commercial dispute. Where defendant discloses facts of prima facie fair and reasonable defence, unconditional leave may be granted. It relates to subjective satisfaction of court on basis of materials that may be placed before it. However, where court is satisfied that defence is plausible or probable and is not sham or moonshine but still it has some doubt over defence, then conditional leave may be granted to defend. In case of unconditional leave, subjective satisfaction of court is involved whereas in conditional leave element of discretion vests with court. This discretion is not absolute but required to be exercised judiciously tempered with what is just and proper in facts of particular case. While exercising discretion it is required to maintain delicate balance between respective rights and contentions by not passing an order which may ultimately impede speedy resolution of dispute. [Sudin Dilip Talaulikar v. Polycap Wires (P) Ltd., (2019) 7 SCC 577]

Civil Procedure Code, 1908 — S. 100 — Substantial question of law: Framing of substantial question of law, sine qua non for exercise of jurisdiction under S. 100. Whether appellate court can reverse findings recorded by trial court adverting to specific findings of trial court and whether judgment of lower appellate court was perverse and outcome of misreading of evidence, not substantial questions of law. [Gurnam Singh v. Lehna Singh, (2019) 7 SCC 641]

Constitution of India — Art. 136 — Ram Janmabhoomi/Babri Masjid suit — Dispute as to ownership of land on which stood place of worship: In this case, there was resumption of hearing of cases/appeals on failure of mediation in appeals arising out of Suits Nos. 3 and 4, hence, parties directed to indicate pleadings and evidence on which they sought to rely so that Registry can keep such documents ready for perusal of Court. [Mohd. Siddiq v. Suresh Das, (2019) 7 SCC 633]

Constitution of India — Sch. VII List II Entries 6, 8, 51(a) and 66 — State Legislature’s competence to make law or regulate or impose tax/fee/impost/levy: Noti. dt. 6-11-2012 and R. 106(Tha) issued under S. 90, Jharkhand Excise Act, 1915 (2 of 1915), held, valid as it is clear that levy concerned was on IMFL (alcohol fit for human consumption), thus within legislative competence of State under List II. [State of Jharkhand v. Ajanta Bottlers & Blenders (P) Ltd., (2019) 7 SCC 545]

Contract Labour (Regulation and Abolition) Act, 1970 — S. 10(1) r/w Ss. 20(1), 13(1) and 14, Minimum Wages Act, 1948: The CLRA Act, 1970 is not applicable after issuance of prohibition notification under S. 10(1) for determining minimum wages payable to erstwhile contract labourers. Minimum wages in such circumstances could be claimed under Minimum Wages Act, 1948 in independent proceedings. [SAIL v. Jaggu, (2019) 7 SCC 658]

Criminal Law — Criminal Trial — Circumstantial Evidence — Generally: It is well settled that in the cases of circumstantial evidence, the circumstances from which the conclusion of guilt is to be drawn, should in the first instance, be fully established, and all the facts so established, should be consistent only with the hypothesis of guilt of the accused. The circumstances should be of a conclusive nature, and should be such, as to exclude every hypothesis, but the one proposed to be proved. In other words, there must be a complete chain of evidence, as not to leave any reasonable ground for a conclusion consistent with the innocence of the accused, and it must be such, as to show that within all human probability, the act must have been done by the accused and none else. [State of Rajasthan v. Mahesh Kumar, (2019) 7 SCC 678]

Determination of existence of arbitration agreement: This article deals with the settled principles laid down for determining the existence of an arbitration agreement as well as the various ways an arbitration agreement can come into existence. Determining an Arbitration Agreement — Different Scenarios And Inconsistent Application by Akkant Kumar Mittal [(2019) 7 SCC J-13]

Evidence Act, 1872 — Ss. 101 and 106 — Burden of proof in criminal case — Lies upon whom: General rule is that burden of proof is on prosecution. However, S. 106 was introduced not to relieve prosecution of their duty, but it is designed to meet situation, in which it would be impossible or difficult for prosecution to establish facts which are especially within knowledge of accused. [Ranjit Kumar Haldar v. State of Sikkim, (2019) 7 SCC 684]

Frustration of contract: This article attempts to review (and perhaps clarify) the legal principles governing frustration of contract under current Indian case law. While doing so, this article does not analyse the relevant case law from a normative perspective. It does, however, advance the proposition that Indian law recognises a distinction between frustration of a contract as a result of “internal forces” and frustration of a contract as a result of “external forces” i.e. the nature of impossibility resulting in frustration of a contract. Principles Governing Frustration of Contract under Indian Law by Gaurav Pachnanda [(2019) 7 SCC J-1]

Karnataka Sales Tax Rules, 1957 — R. 6(4)(m)(i) r/w Expln. III to R. 6(4) and S. 5-B of Karnataka Sales Tax Act, 1957: Condition in R. 6(4)(m)(i) restricting deduction in respect of goods which have already suffered tax, to such goods as are used in the same form in which the goods are purchased, valid. Rejecting contention that condition under R. 6(4)(m)(i) of goods that are purchased be used “in the same form” is beyond the charging section (S. 5-B) of KST Act, held, S. 5-B and R. 6(4)(m)(i) operate in different spheres. S. 5-B is a charging provision for levy of sales tax whereas R. 6(4)(m)(i) is a provision for deduction from tax and under S. 5-B, tax can be levied on transfer of property in the goods whether as goods or in some other form whereas R. 6(4)(m)(i) provides for a deduction in respect of goods which have already suffered tax and which are used in the same form. Thus, said rule is in consonance with the charging provision and does not militate against S. 5-B of KST Act, 1957. [Craft Interiors (P) Ltd. v. CCT, (2019) 7 SCC 535]

M.P. Reorganisation Act, 2000 (Central Act 28 of 2000) — Ss. 78, 79, 80, 85, 86, 3, 5, 2(e), (f), (j) & (k) and Pt. II — Deemed adoption of laws/delegated legislation of erstwhile State in successor States (S. 79): When trade is within the territorial limits of each successor State, no difficulty of regarding it as intra- State trade and said incentive available but when trade is between the successor States, it has to be regarded as inter-State trade and therefore, in view of Art. 286 of the Constitution as it applied prior to its amendment on 16-9-2016, said exemption/incentive would not be available. [State of M.P. v. Lafarge Dealers Assn., (2019) 7 SCC 584]

Penal Code, 1860 — S. 302 or S. 304 [S. 300 Exception 4] — Murder or culpable homicide: In this case of sudden fight as there was unpremeditated attack, conviction was modified to one under S. 304 Pt. II in the facts and circumstances of the case. [Sita Ram v. State (NCT of Delhi), (2019) 7 SCC 531]

Penal Code, 1860 — Ss. 302, 365 and 201 r/w S. 34: In this case of kidnapping for ransom and murder of child by maternal uncles, n the basis of circumstantial evidence of last seen together, recovery of dead body and murder weapon and conduct of accused, conviction confirmed. [Munawwar v. State of U.P., (2019) 7 SCC 653]

Religious Freedom and other Fundamental Rights: This article attempts to defend and discuss the implications of the issue that the religious freedom guaranteed under Article 25(1) is inferior to and subject to other Part III provisions. Individual Religious Freedom Is Subject To Other Fundamental Rights by Shrutanjaya Bhardwaj [(2019) 7 SCC J-29]

Service Law — Reinstatement/Back Wages/Arrears — Back wages — Entitlement to: Back wages cannot be claimed for period of unauthorised absence or absence without justification. However, back wages can be claimed where employee is restrained from engaging in service. [United India Insurance Co. Ltd. v. Siraj Uddin Khan, (2019) 7 SCC 564]

Transfer of Property Act, 1882 — S. 58(c) and proviso thereto and S. 54 — Conditional sale mortgage (CSM) or absolute sale — Determination of — Principles summarized: No transaction shall be deemed to be a conditional sale mortgage (CSM) unless condition in respect thereof is embodied in document which effects or purports to effect sale.  Therefore, any recital relating to mortgage or transaction being in nature of conditional sale should be intrinsic part of the very same sale deed. Furthermore, even in case of single document, real character of transaction is to be ascertained from provisions of deed viewed in light of surrounding circumstances and intention of parties. If sale and agreement to repurchase are embodied in separate documents then such transaction cannot be conditional sale mortgage (CSM) irrespective of whether documents are contemporaneously executed. A sale with mere condition of retransfer is not a mortgage. [Sopan v. Syed Nabi, (2019) 7 SCC 635]

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