Case BriefsHigh Courts

Karnataka High Court: P.G.M. Patil, J. issued guidelines to be followed by Judicial Magistrates, for passing of orders when requisition is submitted by the SHO of police station seeking permission to investigate, non-cognizable offence.

In this case the H.N. Shirahatti, PSI Kagwad Police station received information that within the limits of Mole Village some people were playing gambling for there personal benefit which is contrary to law and illegal. He filed a complaint and therefore proceeded to the spot after informing the Dy. SP and CPI, under there instruction and guidance. On reaching the spot he found that certain person were saying Yakka means Rs 100. and they conducted raid and caught hold 13 persons and recovered cash of Rs 10,250 On the basis of the complaint, the SHO registered a crime for offence under Section 87 of Karnataka Police Act Act. Subsequently, after investigation, a charge sheet was filed against the petitioner and other accused for the offence punishable under Section 87 of the Act. 

The petitioner’s counsel submitted that the complaint is misconceived, and the alleged offence is non-cognizable as per the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (CrPC). Therefore, the police have no authority to investigate the crime. It was further submitted that the police have not complied with mandatory requirement of Sections 155(1) and 155(2) of CrPC. On contrary, the respondent’s (Government) counsel said that thejurisdictional Magistrate has permitted the concerned police to take up investigation and therefore, there is compliance of Section 155(2) of CrPC.

It was opined by the Court that the police officer has no authority of law unless the jurisdictional magistrate permits the police officer for investigation of the non-cognizable offence. The Court relied upon Mukkatira Anitha Machaiah v. State of Karnataka, 2013 SCC OnLine Kar 6703 where it was held that under Section 155 of CrPC when the officer in charge gets the information for the commission of non-cognizable offence then he shall enter or cause to enter the information in prescribed book and refer the informant to magistrate; and under Section 155(2) no police officer shall investigate a non-cognizable case without a order of a Magistrate having power to try such case or commit the case for trial.

The Court thus issued guidelines to be followed by Judicial Magistrates, as to how they have to approach and pass orders when requisition is submitted by the SHO of police station seeking permission to investigate, non-cognizable offence. Some of them were that the word ‘permitted’ is not an order in the eyes of law and when the requisition is submitted by the informant to the Jurisdictional Magistrate, he should make an endorsement on it as to how it was received, either by post or by Muddam. When the Magistrate passes the orders permitting the investigation, he/she shall specify the rank and designation of the Police Officer who has to investigate the case.[Vaggeppa Gurulinga Jangaligi v. State of Karnataka, Criminal Petition No. 101997 of 2019, decided on 10-12-2019]

Case BriefsHigh Courts

Sikkim High Court: Arup Kumar Goswami, CJ. quashed a criminal case under Section 482 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973.

In the present case, the respondent filed an FIR as the petitioner insulted the respondent, where there was a possibility of her getting hit. A case was registered under Sections 186, 353, 509 of the Penal Code, 1860. At the time of trial, the Sessions Judge held that there was no material to frame charge under Section 506 of IPC and the said petition was modified. The petitioner also filed a Private Complaint in a police station against the respondent which was pending in the Court of Judicial Magistrate. The respondent filed a revision application to stop the court from summoning her which was dismissed.

Advocate, Simeon Subba appearing on behalf of the petitioner submitted that the parties had resolved their differences and a deed of compromise was entered into by and between them which stated that the petitioner will withdraw the Private Complaint Case and the respondent will not object to the application filed by the petitioner. Therefore, the General Registered Case pending in the Magistrate’s Court should be quashed.

Jorgay Namka, Advocate appearing on behalf of the respondent also submitted the same.

The High Court with respect to the above observed that the petitioner was facing charges under Sections 186, 290 and 353 of the IPC which were non-compoundable offences. The Court further relied on the case of Gian Singh v. State of Punjab, (2012) 10 SCC 303 where it was held that a Court can quash proceedings in a non-compoundable proceeding where it is of the opinion that continuation of the criminal proceedings will be pointless and against the process of securing justice. The Supreme Court also cautioned that such power is to be exercised keeping in mind the nature and gravity of the crime.

Further, adding to its observation, the High Court, said that the offence was not heinous and serious and since the parties had amicably resolved their differences, it would be against the interest of justice to not quash the criminal proceeding against the petitioner and therefore, the case was quashed. [Krishna Lall Timsina v. Kanu Priya Rai, 2019 SCC OnLine Sikk 196, decided on 02-12-2019]

Case BriefsHigh Courts

Tripura High Court: A Bench of Arindam Lodh, J. allowed a petition for quashing of criminal proceedings pending against the petitioner.

The petitioner was arrested with other co-accused in connection with a crime under Sections 364-A, 302 and 201 IPC along with Section 27 of Arms Act. The petitioner through his counsel D. Bhattacharya, Advocate submitted that after investigation, the chargesheet submitted by the Investigating officer did not show his name. Further, that the IO specifically observed that there was no evidence against the petitioner. However, after taking cognizance of the case, the Judicial Magistrate (First class), Sonamura issued an arrest warrant against all the accused including the petitioner. Aggrieved thereby, the present petition was filed.

After carefully perusing the record, the High Court expressed serious dissatisfaction to the conduct of JMFC who did not think it necessary to go through the chargesheet itself. This, according to the court, is unexpected from a Judicial Officer. The JMFC was cautioned that any such mistake in future would draw appropriate action. It was observed, “It is the solemn duty of the court to protect the life and liberty of a citizen and none should be harassed unnecessarily”. The Court was satisfied that the petitioner was discharged by the IO and therefore it allowed the petition by quashing the proceedings pending against the petitioner. [Priyalal Debbarma v. State of Tripura, 2018 SCC OnLine Tri 261, Order dated 05-12-2018]